Why Solitary Confinement Hurts Juveniles More Than Adults; News Roundup

by Cecilia Bianco

News-oldTV-smlJuvenile Justice Reform

  • In Their Own Words, Inmates Discuss the Riddle of Juvenile Justice (JJIE)
    The John Howard Association of Illinois, an independent prison watchdog and justice reform advocate, recently published a report introducing ways to reform the criminal justice system for youth prosecuted for serious offenses. This report takes a unique approach in asking the population in question about their experiences in the judicial system.
              • Seven Charged in Sayreville Hazing Case Could Be Tried as Adults (The New York Times)
                The acts of violent sexual hazing that seven New Jersey high school football players are accused of committing have been called “horrendous” by school officials and “extraordinarily disturbing” by Gov. Chris Christie. Now, as the players from Sayreville War Memorial High School await their first court hearing this week, Middlesex County authorities face a daunting question under escalating scrutiny: whether to charge some or all of the boys as adults.

  • Why Solitary Confinement Hurts Juveniles More Than Adults (Pacific Standard)
    In a long-awaited move, New York City’s Department of Correction has finally decided to end its practice of putting teenaged offenders in solitary confinement cells. Currently, fights and other infractions can land kids in solitary for weeks, months, sometimes years.

Jobs, Grants, Events and Webinars

  • Please share the Reclaiming Futures Opportunity Board with your colleagues in the juvenile justice, adolescent substance abuse and teen mental health areas. It’s free to browse and post!

Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment and Mental Health

  • Christie Announces $12M in New Addiction Treatment Funds (NorthJersey.com)
    “If we continue to work together to remove the stigma, to promote addiction treatment rather than addiction as a societal issue that denigrates and lowers people, then than we have an opportunity to have more and more people realize what a gift their life really is,” Governor Christie said.
  • Teen Challenge Begins to Make a Difference in Madison County (The Jackson Sun)
    “The courts are seeing the advantages of putting them in a program like this rather than putting them in jail,” Teen Challenge sponsor and Madison County Commissioner Gary Deaton said. “If they can put them in a program like this, they won’t be in court anymore. It’ll change their life.”

Opportunity Board Roundup: Juvenile Justice Grants, Jobs, Webinars and Events

by Cecilia Bianco

opportunityBelow you’ll find a selection of the latest grants, jobs, webinars and events posted to our Opportunity Board. Please share the Reclaiming Futures Opportunity Board with your colleagues in the juvenile justice, adolescent substance abuse and teen mental health areas. It’s free to browse and post!

Webinars

Events

Request for Proposals to Become a Reclaiming Futures Site Now Available

by Jim Carlton

Now is your opportunity to bring Reclaiming Futures to your community? A recent grant from the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation will fund two new Reclaiming Futures sites, and the request for proposals is available here. We will host a webinar for potential applicants on Wednesday, October 22nd, at 2:30 p.m. Eastern / 11:30 a.m. Pacific. Learn […]

SAMHSA Releases 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health Results

by Cecilia Bianco

samhsaThe Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) recently released the results of the 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH). NSDUH, the Nation’s largest survey of drug use and drug-related attitudes, perceptions and consequences, interviews approximately 70,000 Americans who are 12 and older.

The resulting report displays national estimates on rates of use, numbers of users, and other measures related to illicit drugs, alcohol and tobacco products, with a focus on trends between 2012 and 2013 and from 2002 to 2013.

Key findings of the 2013 NSDUH are as follows:

  • In 2013, an estimated 24.6 million Americans aged 12 or older were current (past month) illicit drug users, representing 9.4 percent of this population.
  • Current illicit drug use in 2013 was statistically unchanged from 2012 (9.2 percent) but continues a gradual increase since 2002.
  • Almost 20 million (4 out of 5 current illicit drug users) used marijuana alone or in combination with other drugs.
  • Among current marijuana users, 8 million (2 out of 5) were daily or almost daily users, who used marijuana on 20 or more days in the past month.
  • An estimated 2.8 million persons aged 12 or older used an illicit drug for the first time within the past 12 months – an average of about 7,800 new users per day.
  • Most of the above new users (7 out of 10) reported that their first drug was marijuana. About 1 in 5 initiated with non-medical use of prescription drugs.

For complete findings, view 2013 NSDUH: Summary of National Findings.

Note: NSDUH national estimates related to mental health and NSDUH State-level estimates related to both substance use and mental health will be published in separate releases in the fall of 2014.

Marijuana Studies Reveal Some Risks Not Known Before; News Roundup

by Cecilia Bianco

News-oldTV-smlJuvenile Justice Reform

  • New Web-Based Expungement Tools Launched by IL, MD, LA (National Juvenile Justice Network)
    Having a record—even from youth court—can drastically affect a young person’s life chances, including their prospects of education, employment, and housing. Expunging that record is one way to address this issue, but the requirements for expungement are often opaque to many who are eligible.
  • Critics Point to Problems in Louisiana’s Reformed Juvenile Justice System (JJIE)
    Reports of gladiator-style fighting, guards molesting children and a lack of basic education for kids as young as 14 once gave Louisiana’s juvenile justice system the reputation of one of the worst in the country. In 2003, the Louisiana Legislature passed sweeping reforms. Over time, those efforts helped whittle down the number of kids locked in sprawling, prison-like facilities from more than 2,000 to about 350 today.
  • No Country for Young Men (The Marshall Project)
    On Feb. 27, 2013, 17-year-old Junior Smith was summoned to the front office of his Philippi, West Virginia, high school. It was eighth period, just a few minutes before everyone would start streaming out of the building for dismissal. When Junior got to the office, a police officer was there, waiting for him. The officer handcuffed Junior and led him past his staring classmates to a waiting patrol car.

Jobs, Grants, Events and Webinars

  • Please share the Reclaiming Futures Opportunity Board with your colleagues in the juvenile justice, adolescent substance abuse and teen mental health areas. It’s free to browse and post!

Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment and Mental Health

  • Children’s Mental Health Changes Aimed at Addressing ER Crisis (CT Mirror)
    Gov. Dannel P. Malloy is expected to announce a plan Wednesday to expand the services available for children and teens with significant mental health needs, a response to concerns about the growing number of young people going to — and often stuck in — emergency rooms in psychiatric crisis.
  • Butte Lands Big Grant for Suicide Prevention (Montana Standard)
    Butte public schools have landed a massive grant aimed at preventing suicide. The district will split the $1.2 million grant with Kalispell and Browning public schools, part of a series of grants announced this week by Superintendent Denise Juneau of the Montana Office of Public Instruction.
  • Marijuana Studies Reveal Some Risks Not Known Before (The Wichita Eagle)
    With clever names like Peace of Mind, Girl Scout Cookies, Train Wreck and Tsunami, it’s a good bet that the marketers of legal marijuana finished high school. That’s less certain for their younger customers. New research shows daily marijuana use before the age of 17 cuts your chances of graduating from high school or getting a college degree by 60 percent.

Opportunity Board Roundup: Juvenile Justice Grants, Jobs, Webinars and Events

by Cecilia Bianco

opportunityBelow you’ll find a selection of the latest grants, jobs, webinars and events posted to our Opportunity Board. Please share the Reclaiming Futures Opportunity Board with your colleagues in the juvenile justice, adolescent substance abuse and teen mental health areas. It’s free to browse and post!

Webinars

Jobs

Events

 

The White House Celebrates 25th Anniversary of Recovery Month

by Cecilia Bianco

whitehouseThe Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) honored 25 years of National Alcohol and Drug Addiction Recovery Month with a special event at the White House on September 17, 2014. More than 175 advocates, recovery community leaders, persons in long-term recovery, and others who have been impacted by substance use and its consequences came together to commemorate the 25th anniversary.

The highlight of the night was a panel discussion composed of five prominent public figures in long-term recovery from substance use disorders:

  • Cris Carter, a Pro Football Hall of Fame inductee and ESPN Analyst who has been in recovery for 25 years;
  • Ruben Castañeda, a former Washington Post Journalist and author of the book “S Street Rising,” a memoir of his own descent into a serious crack addiction;
  • Tim Willson, Mayor of Brooklyn Center, MN, who lost his daughter to an opioid overdose;
  • Christina Huffington, daughter of publisher Arianna Huffington and advocate for her fellow youth in recovery;
  • and Laurie Dhue, a former Fox News anchor, who moderated the panel.

Each panelist shared their personal story of recovery and answered viewer questions, which were submitted via Twitter.

The event also featured messages from former U.S. Rep. Patrick Kennedy and Steve Ford, son of former President Gerald Ford and First Lady Betty Ford.

ONDCP encourages all to continue the spotlight on recovery by:

  • Continuing the discussion! Tweet your thoughts to ONDCP Acting Director Michael Botticelli, @Botticelli44, using the hashtag #RecoveryatWH.
  • Viewing the live-stream! If you missed it (or want to enjoy the experience again), the full archived video can be seen here.
  • Connecting with the ONDCP on Social Media! Like the ONDCP on Facebook for news and updates on policies to support persons in recovery from substance use disorders.

National Drug Facts Week: Linking Teens with Scientific Experts

by Susan Richardson
Register to host an educational event for National Drug Facts Week in your community. Get started now with FREE materials!

Now more than ever, teens have quick and easy access to Internet, TV, music and other media communicating potentially dangerous drug myths. Coupled with pressure from peer groups, substance use is often cast as a cool or inevitable part of growing up.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) aims to counteract these myths during National Drug Facts Week, coming up Jan. 26 through Feb. 1, 2015.

During this week, we completely support the effort of National Drug Facts Week to bring together teens with addiction scientists or health experts to discuss drug use and addiction. The opportunity to host an event in your community is open to a variety of organizations, including schools, community groups, sports clubs, and hospitals. These discussions are designed to shatter drug myths by connecting teens with experts and educating teens about the impact of substance use.

NIDA offers all the tools to create an event, publicize it, find an expert and obtain educational information to cover at your event.

The website is designed with teen-friendly language and graphics to make it easy for teens to also take action and host events among their peers.

To make events engaging, NIDA will arm you with helpful, interactive tools:

Event holders who register online will receive free booklets with science-based facts about drugs, including one of NIDA’s most in-demand teen publications, “Drugs: Shatter the Myths.” Also this year, NIDA offers three interactive tools that can be projected on large screens at events or used with mobile devices:

  • The online 2015 National Drug IQ Challenge is a 12-question multiple choice quiz that teens and adults can take to test their knowledge about drugs. Past-year challenges can be found here. The 2015 challenge will be posted when it is available.
  • The interactive version of the popular poster “Drugs + Your Body: It Isn’t Pretty” highlights the effects drugs have on the teen body. It was created in partnership with Scholastic.

Register your event and share the news with your networks!

Oklahoma Sees New Push to Allow Juvenile Competency Hearings; News Roundup

by Cecilia Bianco

News-oldTV-smlJuvenile Justice Reform

  • Oklahoma Sees New Push to Allow Juvenile Competency Hearings (JJIE)
    In Oklahoma, competency determinations are allowed in cases where a juvenile is tried as an adult and in “youthful offender” cases, in which a teenager is adjudicated for a serious crime but with limited punishment and probation. A person found incompetent can be sent to a clinic or medical professional who will try to establish competency within a certain time. If he or she remains incompetent, the charges are dismissed and the person is ordered to undergo community- or facility-based treatment.
  • The Legislation that has the Potential to Reduce Youth Recidivism in California(Nation Swell)
    Nationwide, 80 percent of incarcerated juvenile offenders end up behind bars again. For California — the state with the highest rate of incarcerated youth — this has to stop. But now, a new bipartisan-approved bill (currently waiting Gov. Jerry Brown’s signature) could change this troubling statistic, VoiceWaves reports.

  • New Juvenile Court Diversion Program Gets Off Ground in ICCSD (Press-Citizen)
    A new juvenile justice diversion program for students in the Iowa City Community School District is up and running, though it has only been put to use once in the month since it was introduced.

  • Michigan Considering Changes in Juvenile Justice System (WLNS.com)
    Michigan’s juvenile justice director is meeting with directors from three other states to discuss changes to their juvenile corrections system. Michigan has been selected to take part in the six month program. 6 News Nick Perreault talked with Michigan’s Department of Human Services on what they want to look at and present to the governor in the months ahead.

Jobs, Grants, Events and Webinars

  • Please share the Reclaiming Futures Opportunity Board with your colleagues in the juvenile justice, adolescent substance abuse and teen mental health areas. It’s free to browse and post!

Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment and Mental Health

  • Federal Grant to Help Region Battle Youth Drug Abuse (Leader-Telegram)
    DFC is a federal grant program of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy that provides funding to community-based coalitions that organize to prevent youth substance use. Since the passage of the DFC Act in 1997, the DFC program has funded more than 2,000 coalitions and currently mobilizes nearly 9,000 community volunteers across the country.
  • Substance Abuse Treatment Facility Opens for Adolescents (The Philadelphia Tribune)
    “At PHMC, we believe physical space and innovative design help drive program delivery. This new facility gives us additional opportunities to fulfill our mission to improve the health of our communities and the lives of the individuals and families we serve through this phenomenal program,” said Richard J. Cohen, president and CEO of PHMC.

Opportunity Board Roundup: Juvenile Justice Grants, Jobs, Webinars and Events

by Cecilia Bianco

opportunityBelow you’ll find a selection of the latest grants, jobs, webinars and events posted to our Opportunity Board. Please share the Reclaiming Futures Opportunity Board with your colleagues in the juvenile justice, adolescent substance abuse and teen mental health areas. It’s free to browse and post!

Webinars

Jobs

Events